The LGBT Refugees Who Are Seeking Asylum In the World’s Most Notoriously Anti-Gay Country

Uganda FlagOn May 5, 2014 Buzzfeed World reported: KAMPALA, Uganda — With one of the world’s most infamous anti-gay laws, Uganda seems like the last place on Earth an LGBTI person would go seeking safety. But almost 100 LGBTI refugees have sought help from an NGO in Uganda’s capital to seek asylum in the country, and there may be many more in the country illegally without seeking formal permission to stay.

Many of them have come during the five years Uganda have been debating its Anti-Homosexuality Act, which originally proposed a death sentence for homosexuality. If they’re crossing the border, you can be sure the situations in their home countries are “quite worse than Uganda,” said David, who works for an NGO in Kampala that assists LGBTI asylum-seekers. David asked that his real name not be used out of fear for his safety; one of his colleagues was beaten in a supermarket last year over his LGBTI work. He also asked that the organization he works for not be identified out of concern that it could be shut down by the Ugandan government, since the version of the law enacted in February essentially bans LGBTI advocacy as well as imposing up to a lifetime prison sentence for homosexuality.

“There is a common saying, ‘If you see a rat running from a bush into a hut that is burning, that means it could be hotter in the bush,’” David said. Some people in neighboring countries like the Democratic Republic of Congo or Burundi are fleeing situations that are so bad that they make Uganda seem safe.

One of these asylum-seekers is a trans man from Rwanda who asked to be identified as Green, because of his love of trees. “I like to be near trees,” he said during an interview in Kampala. “They don’t have hate, they don’t reject me, and if I tell them [secrets], they won’t tell everybody.”

Green arrived in Kampala four years ago, still recovering from a police beating at his home in the Rwandan capital, Kigali, that was so severe he walks with a crutch to this day. Green grew up largely on the streets after his father turned his back on him when he was a very small child, but he managed to continue his education all the way through university, determined to be an activist for children’s rights and the rights of the disabled.

According to Green’s account, police showed up at his house a few months after he graduated, accompanied by a neighborhood official, who accused him of recruiting girls into homosexuality even though Rwanda has no law against same-sex intercourse.

“You’re a lesbian,” Green says the police asserted. “You are teaching people [lesbianism] since your childhood.”

When Green denied the accusation, the police officers beat him until he lost consciousness. He ultimately escaped that day, but they hunted him down a few days later and brought him to jail. By twist of fate, one of his former schoolmates was a police officer at the jail, and she arranged for him to escape when he was let out of his cell to go to the bathroom. If he did not flee, the schoolmate warned, he would be sent to the main prison or, more likely, killed.

Green’s relatives helped him sneak across the Ugandan border without papers. He made it to the capital, Kampala, and found a place to live. But then, in 2012, his neighbor began threatening to rape and kill him, he said. Green said he managed to fight off the neighbor the first few times he tried to deliver on his threat, but late one November night the neighbor forced his way into the apartment and raped him. As the neighbor left, he described his plan to to kill Green: The next time he would cover himself with HIV-infected blood before raping Green again so that he would contract the virus.

Going to the police was out of the question. Green’s short-term asylum status had expired, and he had given up on seeking permanent refugee status because the process was too humiliating and risky — his masculine appearance was in conflict with his female legal name. He couldn’t flee to another country because he had no papers and little money. He thought about killing himself.

“I was here in Uganda, but I was in a prison. … I was not able to open my door at any time,” Green said.

After a period of homelessness, he eventually managed to find a new place to stay, far from the rapist neighbor. But now, it is becoming less safe by the day. When he walks down the street, Green says people call him “Obama” — Obama has become a derogatory word for people who support LGBTI rights.

“I think every [day] I can be arrested again or killed,” Green said. “There is no life” for him in Uganda, he said.

Surprisingly, LGBTI people could easily register as asylum-seekers with the Ugandan government before the law became law in February. David, the NGO employee, said he knew of at least four cases in the past year in which his clients had even declared they were seeking asylum because of sexual orientation-based persecution and had their petitions granted by the office of the prime minister’s office, which reviews asylum claims.  Continued

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